Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) in Dogs: Symptoms, Diagnosis, Treatment, and Prevention

Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) in Dogs: Symptoms, Diagnosis, Treatment, and Prevention

Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) is a serious, chronic condition that affects many dog breeds. The most common signs of IBD in dogs are weight loss, diarrhea, and abdominal discomfort. Some dogs may also experience vomiting and nausea. IBD can be difficult to diagnose in dogs, since there are many possible causes of the symptoms. Often, a diagnosis is based on a dog’s history and physical examination. Blood tests may also be used to rule out other diseases. The information contained herein is general information and is NOT intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice.

What Causes IBD?

It is not fully understood why some dogs develop the IBD disease and others don’t. One possible cause is a virus. Vaccines can help some dogs who do develop IBD. Vaccines may also prevent IBD in other types of animals. Symptoms of IBD in Dogs Abdominal discomfort Stomach bloating Vomiting Vomiting with foul-smelling gas (hay fever-like symptoms) Diarrhea Bloody stools Vomiting blood Some dogs with IBD may show no symptoms at all, or only small signs. Diagnosis A blood test can be used to confirm the diagnosis of IBD in a dog. Blood tests may also be used to diagnose IBD in other animals. Blood tests may be used to detect the presence of viruses, such as herpes virus 1 (HSV1). However, other causes for these symptoms can also be ruled out.

What Are the General Symptoms of IBD?

Weight loss Rectal temperature above normal Diarrhea and vomiting Rectal bleeding Abdominal pain Diagnosis IBD is a diagnosis that involves diagnosing an inflammatory bowel disease, such as Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis. Some dogs may also have one of the following other causes: Virus Crohn’s disease Fever with an unknown cause Fever with an unknown cause Fever with an unknown cause Anemia Ulcerative colitis Other diseases Diagnosis requires a complete physical examination, including blood tests and examinations of the digestive tract.

How Is IBD Diagnosed?

By looking at the dogs’ symptoms, a doctor can look for blood in the stool, unusual bowel movements, or other evidence of IBD. Other common symptoms of IBD in dogs include: abdominal pain shiny or inflamed bowel fatigue loss of appetite vomiting discharge from the dog’s eyes Diagnosis for IBD is done in two ways. Isolation : The dog’s owner is asked to provide a list of typical, healthy foods that the dog normally eats. A dog’s stool is examined, and if blood is found, the doctor can use a blood test to make a diagnosis. : The dog’s owner is asked to provide a list of typical, healthy foods that the dog normally eats. A dog’s stool is examined, and if blood is found, the doctor can use a blood test to make a diagnosis.

How Is IBD Treated?

The treatment of IBD in dogs includes careful attention to diet. Your veterinarian may be able to recommend a food formulated for IBD. With more research and more veterinarians adopting the WCO method, food formulated specifically for IBD is becoming more available. Diarrhea. Signs of diarrhea include increased water consumption, frequent bathroom trips, and increased thirst. Symptoms of diarrhea may worsen during exercise and in the heat. Therefore, the veterinarian may prescribe an anti-diarrhea medication. Weight Loss. Your veterinarian may be able to recommend a high-quality dog food to help your dog regain lost weight. Vomiting and Nausea. Signs of vomiting and nausea may include vomiting, regurgitation, and foaming at the mouth.

What Should I Feed My Dog With IBD?

Companion animals such as dogs can often live healthy and active lives with IBD, but they can experience a range of complications. For example, some symptoms of IBD include an enlarged spleen, arthritis, and an immune system that is constantly fighting against the bowel’s own tissue. In other cases, IBD can lead to serious health problems. For instance, a severe form of the disease may cause a dog to develop pancreatitis, where pancreatic cells are consumed by the intestinal cells. Pancreatitis can lead to other problems, including high blood pressure and heart disease. A better diet with less fat and protein, along with more anti-inflammatory foods, can help dogs suffering from IBD live happy and healthy lives.

When Is It Time to See The Vet?

IBD symptoms can be mild or severe. Most cases can be treated effectively with medication. If a dog has significant symptoms that aren’t improving, or if the IBD has already spread to the intestines and other parts of the body, you should see a veterinarian. Common Treatment Options for IBD in Dogs Neurological management: Stopping or decreasing the use of dietary non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDS) is the first-line treatment for IBD in dogs. Doctors often prescribe fluconazole (Doxorubicin) for dogs with severe diarrhea. The medication may be administered by injection or orally, in addition to dietary therapy. Stopping or decreasing the use of dietary non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDS) is the first-line treatment for IBD in dogs.

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